Beat the Beast of Dental Disease: Part 1 of 5 - We Were Born to be Healthy: What Happened?
You will receive 2 credit(s) of continuing education credit upon successful completion of this course. The purchase price of this course is $72.00

Description:

Beat the Beast of Dental Disease is a 5 Part continuing education program that ultimately will get to the bottom of dental disease and show you, the dental practitioner, how to implement a simple, unique, and effective program for your patients. To get you there, my story builds from the evolution of our primal ancestors through today’s science and peer-reviewed research. In this program, you will understand how we arrived where we are today and what might be done to correct the problem moving forward.

I’m not going to discuss the treatment of the manifestations of dental diseases. I am going to discuss prevention.

This is an organized, simple, science-based program. It is cutting-edge. I believe the timing is right. And by the way, a side effect for your patients will be a significantly healthier body overall for the rest of their lives. You too will benefit from these concepts if you implement them into your own lives.

 

After this course, please see all other courses in this series:

Beat the Beast of Dental Disease: Part 2 of 5 - Causes of Dental Disease: The Obvious and the Not-So-Obvious
Beat the Beast of Dental Disease: Part 3 of 5 - Dental Diseases and Systematic Diseases: Correlation or Causation?
Beat the Beast of Dental Disease: Part 4 of 5 - Four Pillars of Health: Nutrient-Dense Foods, Efficient Exercise, Restorative Sleep, and Reduction of Stress
Beat the Beast of Dental Disease: Part 5 of 5 - A 5-Step in Office Program


Author:
Alvin Danenberg, DDS
Show Bio...
Learning Objectives:
  • Do you see a lot of gum disease in your practice?
  • Do you see a lot of dental decay in your practice?
  • What percentage of your patients has gum disease?
  • What percentage of your patients has dental decay?

My guess is that a lot of your patients have dental disease. The prevalence of these diseases in the US and globally is staggering.



Outline:

Prevalence of Gum Disease

Prevalence of Tooth Decay

Questions to Consider

Perspective is Everything

What We Know

Real Life Examples of Healthy Societies

Chronic Disease & Chronic Inflammation

The Gut Is The Big Player In All This

Paleolithic-type Diets and Dental Disease

Vicious Cycle

Test


References:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20437720

[2] Eke, P.I.; Dye, B.A.; Wei, L.; Thornton-Evans, G.O.; Genco, R.J. Prevalence of Periodontitis in Adults in the United States: 2009 and 2010. JDR. 2012:10, 914-920.

[3] http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/FindDataByTopic/DentalCaries/DentalCariesAdults20to64.htm

[4] http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/FindDataByTopic/DentalCaries/DentalCariesSeniors65older.htm

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23720570

[6] http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/149782/1/9789241549028_eng.pdf

[7] Adler, Christina J, et al. Sequencing ancient calcified dental plaque shows changes in oral microbiota with dietary shifts of the Neolithic and Industrial revolutions. Nature Genetics. 2013:45 450-455.

[8] Humphrey, L.T.; De Groote; I.; Morales, J.; Barton, N.; Collcutt, S.; Bronk Ramsey, C.; Bouzouggar, A. Earliest evidence for caries and exploitation of starchy plant foods in Pleistocene hunter-gatherers from Morocco. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2014, 3, 954-9.

[9] https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30172254

[10] www.nytimes.com/2012/10/28/magazine/the-island-where-people-forget-to-die.html  

[11] http://www.staffanlindeberg.com/TheKitavaStudy.html

[12] http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/

[13] Spreadbury, Ian. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. 2012:5 175-189.

[14] Hujoel, P. Dietary carbohydrates and dental systemic diseases. J Dent Res. 2009: 88(6), 490-502.

[15] Klaus, HD; Tam, ME. Oral health and the postcontact adaptive transition: a contextual reconstruction of diet in Morrope, Peru. Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010: 141(4), 594-609.

[16] Spreadbury, Ian. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. 2012:5 175-189.

[17] Spreadbury, Ian. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. 2012:5 175-189.

[18] http://ndb.nal.usda.gov (homepage on Internet). NDL/FNIC Food Composition Database. Agricultural Research Service National Agricultural Library (modified Dec 7, 2011. Available from http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods. Accessed November 2014.

[19] http://ndb.nal.usda.gov (homepage on Internet). NDL/FNIC Food Composition Database. Agricultural Research Service National Agricultural Library (modified Dec 7, 2011. Available from http://ndb.nal.usda.gov. Accessed November 2014.

[20] Spreadbury, I. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes 2012, 5, 175-89.

[21] Hujoel, P. Dietary carbohydrates and dental systemic diseases. J Dent Res. 2009: 88(6), 490-502.

[22] Lockhart, PB, et al. Periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease: does the evidence support an independent association? Circulation. 2012 May 22;125(20):2520-44.

[23] Fasano, A. Zonulin and Its Regulation of Intestinal Barrier Function: The Biological Door to Inflammation, Autoimmunity, and Cancer. Physiological. 2011 January 1; Vol. 91 no. 1:151-175.

[24] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4239493/

[25] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3499456/

[26] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23386648 

[27] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3187554/

[28] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21348914

[29] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17452558

[30] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4055614/

[31] http://www.hopkinsarthritis.org/physician-corner/rheumatology-rounds/round-34-periodontal-disease-and-rheumatoid-arthritis/

[32] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816614/

[33] Paleo diet = lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs, nuts

[34] Mediterranean diet = whole grains, low-fat dairy products, vegetables, fruits, fish, oil, margarine

[35] Diabetes diet = majority of energy would come from vegetables, root vegetables, dietary fiber, whole grain bread, whole grain cereal, fruits, berries, with decreased amounts of total fat

[36] Lindeberg, S; et al. A Palaeolithic diet improves glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischaemic heart disease. Diabetologia. 2007 Sep;50(9):1795-807.

[37] Osterdahl, M; et al. Effects of a short-term intervention with a paleolithic diet in healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 May;62(5):682-5.

[38] Jönsson, T; et al. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study. Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009; 8: 35.

[39] Jönsson, T; et al. A paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010; 7: 85.

[40] Frassetto, LA; et al. Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a Paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Aug;63(8):947-55.

[41] Ryberg, M; et al. A Palaeolithic-type diet causes strong tissue-specific effects on ectopic fat deposition in obese postmenopausal women. J Intern Med. 2013 Jul;274(1):67-76.

[42] Mellberg, C; et al. Long-term effects of a Palaeolithic-type diet in obese postmenopausal women: a two-year randomized trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Mar; 68(3): 350–357.

[43] Boers, I; et al. Favourable effects of consuming a Palaeolithic-type diet on characteristics of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled pilot-study. Lipids Health Dis. 2014; 13(1): 160. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4210559

[44] Baumgartner S, et al. The impact of the stoneage diet on gingival conditions in the absence of oral hygiene. J Perio, 2009:80 759-768. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19405829

[45] Jonsson T, et al. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study. Cardiovase Diabetol. 2009;8:35.

[46] Frassetto, LA, et al. Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. Eur J Clin Hutr. 2009 Aug;63(8) 947-5.

[47] O’Dea K. Marked improvement in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in diabetic Australian aborigines after temporary reversion to traditional lifestyle. Diabetes. 1984;33(6) 596-603.

[48] Spreadbury, Ian. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. 2012:5 175-189.


Release date: December 27, 2016
Review date: January 1, 2016
Expiration date: December 31, 2018



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