3 tips for a more patient-centric practice

By Jay Geier, DrBicuspid.com contributing writer

September 1, 2015 -- What if I told you that to become a more patient-centric practice, you would need to start name calling, hiding your refreshments, and not introducing yourself. You'd probably think I was joking, right? Well, hang with me, but these are actually three valuable pieces of advice that will allow you to impress patients and significantly increase your referrals.

1. Start name calling

Jay Geier
Jay Geier is the president and founder of the Scheduling Institute.

Have you ever noticed that you always respond when you hear your name called? We are trained at an early age to respond when hearing or seeing our name, and, because of this instinct, calling someone's name gets a very positive response. In fact, studies show that when you use someone's name while addressing them, you will receive a 36% higher positive response than if you don't use their name.

So remember, when new patients come in, you should welcome them by using their name. This makes them feel comfortable and at ease. This rule can also be applied in other areas. For instance, when creating a marketing piece, make sure your potential patient's name is on it multiple times; doing so will result in happier patients that feel more connected to you and your practice.

2. Hide your refreshments

“Studies show that when you use someone's name while addressing them, you will receive a 36% higher positive response than if you don't use their name.”

It's awesome that you have a fridge stocked full of ice cold drinks available to your patients as soon as they walk into your reception area. There's just one problem. Instead of feeling like a thoughtful gift from your office to the patient, the availability of these refreshments makes them feel like a commodity.

So, I'm serious when I say, "Hide your refreshments." Put the fridge somewhere that your staff can easily access it when a patient walks in the door. Then, train them to greet patients by name and ask if they would like any cold refreshments. This extra touch will make your patients feel like royalty and make the experience special for them.

3. Don't introduce yourself

Introductions are essential, but did you know that people respect your credentials and reputation a lot less when they hear it all from you? That's why keynote speakers at large events are always -- and I mean always -- introduced by someone else. The person introducing the speaker discusses the individual's accolades, credentials, and why the speaker is suited to lecture on the topic at hand. By the time the speaker walks on stage, the audience is already won over.

Consider yourself the "keynote speaker" of your practice. When staff members leave a patient with you, they should also give you a glowing introduction that will make the patient feel comfortable and confident in your abilities. You should never, ever be introducing yourself to the patient.

See? Those weren't so terrible. The important thing is to always make patients feel as if they are your No. 1 priority. Research what other highly customer-centric companies, like the Ritz-Carlton, are doing to win lifelong customers and take some pages from their rule book. And remember -- have fun with it!

Jay Geier is the president and founder of the Scheduling Institute.

The comments and observations expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the opinions of DrBicuspid.com, nor should they be construed as an endorsement or admonishment of any particular idea, vendor, or organization.


Copyright © 2015 DrBicuspid.com
 

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